8 September - 27 October 2007
Dil Hildebrand

Vernissage: Saturday, September 8th from 2:30pm until 5pm


ABOUT THE SHOW  /  WORKS FOR SALE  /  VIEWS OF THE SHOW  / LINKS  /  ARTIST'S PAGEPFOAC/ANNEXE /



ABOUT THE SHOW

Enigmatic forces are at work upon the landscapes that Dil Hildebrand invents in his paintings and drawings. In Hildebrand's iconography, fragments of wilderness are captured in the ineffable process of an apocalyptic transfiguration. Certain references to the works' own presentation point to the viewer's presence, while invoking both a past and an implied future. Tapping diverse traditions, including Cubism and Surrealism, Hildebrand creates visions of wilderness where actuality is blended with
the imaginary. In these other-world scenarios nature is both maligned and memorialized as sublime objects of otherness.


Dil Hildebrand was born in Winnipeg . In 1998 he obtained his Bachelors degree in Visual Arts from Concordia University, where he is currently a candidate in the Master of Fine Arts programme. He has shown in several group exhibitions throughout Quebec and Canada, and will be included in upcoming group exhibitions in Auckland, New Zealand and Montreal . In 2006, Dil Hildebrand won the prestigious RBC Canadian Painting Competition. He lives and works in Montreal.







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WORKS FOR SALE


(click on images below for larger view, please ensure browser pop-up blockers are disabled)



PAINTINGS




Swamp

2007,
oil on canvas,
152,5 x 267,5 cm
SOLD



  Sans-titre   Sans-titre
 
Untitled

2007,
oil on canvas,
214 x 152,5 cm
SOLD


 
Untitled
(detail)

  Habitat   Habitat
 
Untitled

2007,
oil on canvas,
107 x 122,5 cm
SOLD
 
Habitat

2007,
oil on canvas,
109 x 114,5 cm
SOLD


  Heartland   Black Mirror
 
Heartland

2007,
oil on canvas,
71 x 94,5 cm
SOLD



 
Black Mirror

2007,
oil on canvas,
72 x 81,5 cm
SOLD
  Wet   Black Mirror
 
Wet

2007,
oil on canvas,
71 x 81 cm
SOLD



 
Untitled (Dreber)
2007,
oil on paper mounted on board,
56,5 x 75 cm
SOLD


CHARCOALS



Sans-titre   Sans-titre   Sans-titre

Untitled

2007,
charcoal,
23 x 30 cm
SOLD

 
Untitled

2007,
charcoal,
23 x 30 cm
SOLD


 
Untitled

2007
charcoal,
22.5 x 44.5 cm
SOLD
Sans-titre   Sans-titre   Sans-titre

Untitled

2007,
charcoal,
23 x 30 cm
SOLD
 


Untitled

2007,
charcoal,
23 x 30 cm
SOLD

 


Untitled

2007,
charcoal,
23 x 30 cm
SOLD





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VIEWS OF THE SHOW


 

     
 




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LINKS

Richard Rhodes. "Top Ten Exhibitions of 2007" Canadian Art (online) Jan, 2008
Jérôme Delgado. "Matière à répresentation" Le Devoir (Montreal) 23 September 2007 (in French)
Christine Redfern. "National competition lifts curtain on local painter" The Gazette (Montreal) 27 September 2006





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ARTIST'S PAGE

click here for Dil Hildebrand's official page on www.pfoac.com










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HELD OVER IN PFOAC/ANNEXE



Until 27 October, 2007
Alexandre Castonguay + Mathieu Bouchard + Ken Campbell
Drawing by numbers






In Drawing by Numbers, a wall-mounted plotter lightly engraves participant's images.  The drawings are based on the image analysis of visitor's movements, retaining their outlines. They are registered when people make gestures that are close enough to the coded gestures that are often characteristic of interactive art installations and of the usage of portable electronic devices.

From observing people interact with installations, a few typical gestures emerge: the interactive hand wave, the body shift from side to side, etc. The repetitive gestures of individuals within interactive installations are normalized as they are already socially coded and provide little in the way of emancipation. Other interactive gestures that will be drawn relate to the intimate gestures made when using hand-held devices. This time, the comparison is between the unrestrained gestures used by commerce to promote hand-held products and the actual micro-gestures individuals undergo when actually using such devices.

A study of such interactive gestures finds an unsettling echo in the work studies performed by Frank and Lillian Gilbreth. At the turn of the last century, the couple used time lapse-photography to analyze the motions of workers and propose efficient ways to execute tasks and cut down on superfluous gestures. Industry seized on these studies to increase the efficiency of their workers.

The divergence from a set of model attitudes is analyzed by a program written in PureData and GridFlow by Mathieu Bouchard and myself. The drawing machine is realized with the help of Ken Campbell.  The plotter then records the results as an outline drawing and statistical analysis.

For more information on Drawing by Numbers please visit the page for our past exhibition Encodeurs.



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